StaffGuide: Cataloging and Acquisitions

Audiovisual Materials Policies & Procedures

Expedited Processing of Popular Videos

No authority work will be performed for expedited cataloging (indicated by Bcode3 of “p”). The types of materials that will receive expedited cataloging vs. full cataloging:

  • Expedited Cataloging
    • Popular movie and TV drama videos from commercial entities such as Warner
    • Gift videos
    • Materials ordered on fund “1audi” for which Tim has noted expedited processing
  • Full Cataloging
    • All Arkansas-related titles (including those with Arkansas performers)
    • Non-gift documentary videos
    • Editions from Criterion Collection or Kino
    • Any materials ordered on a subject fund other than “1audi” 
    • Materials ordered on fund “1audi” NOT identified for expedited processing

Processing Procedure

  • Searching and Cataloging Procedures
    • Search Sierra by title for a matching record
      • If found, add one item to the bib record (do not make other changes to the record), follow the instruction of Section III below for item record and physical processing
      • If the bib. record found only contains order record, it is not the matching record.
    • Search OCLC for a matching record.
      • To find the best matching record, perform both the following searching methods. (Usually an OCLC record with “I” in “Elvl” is a good record, while others such as “K” “M” are not good records). 
        • Search by the Publisher Number. An example: mn=VM6785D 
        • Use combined search “title” AND “keyword: DVD” or “title” AND “keyword: VHS” respectively for different format
      • Matching record found (Consider a match if the publisher number (028) and publisher are the same).
        • Update holdings in OCLC: using “F8” or by clicking the icon
        • Export the record: using “F5” or by clicking the icon. Closing the record in the Sierra before the exporting.
        • Call up the exported record in Sierra: by Title or OCLC No.
        • BCODE3. Change to “p” which represents popular video
        • Location. Change to “md Media”
        • 028. Add the field if the publication number is found on the piece
        • 082. Delete the field
        • If no overlay occurs change AFUA to AFUH
        • 050/090. Check the call number to see if it fits in the system. If the “050” number was adjusted, it should be replaced by “090 ##”
        • Fields 245, 508, and 511. (Check the credits in these fields if they exist, adjust the credits’ places according to the full level cataloging procedure.)
          • Field 245: add 700/710 for all the credits in the field
          • Field 508: add 700/710 for important credits in the field according to the full level cataloging procedure, if there are three people or more listed for one role (i.e., music, director of photography), only add 700/710 for the first person/entity
          • Field 511: Add 700 for the host, presenter, or narrator of a documentary; add 700 for the top 3 or 4 actors/actresses of a movie
          • Delete unnecessary 700/710 fields
          • 500. If there is a booklet or leaflet inside the container, check if they are just advertisements for other movies. If so, discard them. If not, add a 500 note. For examples:
            • 500 Scene index (1 p. : ill.) inserted in container
            • 500 Booklet with chapter guide, cast and credits (5 p.) inserted in container
          • 500. Performance rights included (Only when we are told by Acqu. that the item has the performance rights)
          • 655 #7 (For movie videos):
            • Add “655 #7 Feature films” if it is not in the record. (Use “short films” if less than 40 minutes long)
            • Delete headings “Foreign films,” “Motion pictures, French [etc.],” and “Foreign language films”
            • Add another “655 #7 Feature films|z[Country name]” if it is a foreign film. (use “short films” if less than 40 minutes long)
            • For documentary videos:
              • Add “655 #7 Documentary films” if it is not in the record
            • Add 690 ## FormatDVD and 690 ## FormatVideo for DVDs and 690 ##FormatVideo for Videocassettes. Add 690 ## FormatStreaming for streaming videos
          • 830. Second indicator should be “0” and NO initial article for the field
          • Add “945” with your initials
          • Save the changes
        • Record for Different Format Found
          • Export the record in another format without updating the holdings in OCLC 
          • Repeat Step 2 to Step 12 as stated in the above section
          • Correct 260 field to match the publisher name found on the item -
            • |a Place of Publication (or “S.l.” if there is none)
            • |b Record label name
            • |c Date. Use the latest date found on either the item, container, or accompanying material
              • For example: 260 Los Angeles, CA :|b Paramount Pictures,|cc2007 
          • Change 028 field to match the publisher number of the item
            • Enter the number in |a exactly as found
            • Correct |b to match the publisher name transcribed in |b of the 260 field
          • Change 300 field descriptions to match the item in hand. For examples:
            • 300 1 videodisc (101 min.) :|bsd., col. ;|c4 3/4 in.
            • 300 3 videocassettes (264 min.) :|bsd., col. ;|c1/2 in.
          • Change 538 field description to match the item in hand. For examples:
            • 538 DVD ;Dolby digital 2.0 surround ; full frame 1.33:1
            • 538 VHS
            • Save the changes
        • Related Record Found
          • Export the closest record you could find (same title, director, and actors, etc.) without updating the holdings in OCLC
          • Repeat Step 2 to Step 6 as stated in the above section
          • Country Code on the top should reflect the place listed in |a of the 260 field. Codes for U.S. states consist of two-letter postal abbreviation followed by the letter “u.” For example, the code for New York is “nyu.” For a complete list of codes, see the Mark Code List for Countries here http://www.loc.gov/marc/countries
          • 511. Enter performers’ names in the field as appear on the container. For example:
            • 511 1# Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bettany
            • 511 0# Narrated by Sally Kellerman
          • 508. Transcribe the creation/production credits information if found to the field, including photographer, art director, editor, music, costume designer, production designer. For example:
            • 508 ## Director of photography, Roger Deakins ; art director, Robert Guerra ; editor, Mike Hill ; music, James Horner ; costume designer, Rita Ryack ; production designer, Wynn Thomas
          • Save the changes
  • Item Records and Physical Processing (For detailed instructions, consult the procedure: “Processing DVDs” or “Processing Videos”)
    • Attach new item using “mddvd” or “mdvid” item template
    • Enter “g” if the DVD is a gift when the “Icode2” window pops up
    • Stick a barcode on the back of the container without covering information on the container
    • Scan the barcode after the “Barcode” window pops up
    • If there are multiple discs in one container, and/or there is a booklet or leaflet inside the container, enter the information when the “Message” window pops up. For example:
      • 2 DVDs + 1 bklt.
      • 3 DVDs
      • 1 lflt.
    • Save the changes made for the item record
    • Create call number labels
      • Call up the item record for the first piece you wish to label
      • Click “Tools,” then “Queue Spine Labels to Print.”
      • Select a queue (1-9) to use, continue queuing labels until you are ready to print.
      • Click “Tools,” “View Spine Label Queues,” and then click “Print” to print on label sheet
      • For DVD: Stick label to the bottom left of the DVD container. Write the call number on the ring label and stick it to the disc.
      • For Videocassette: Put label on the bottom of the spine. Print additional label and stick it to the upper left corner of the video label, and adjusted leftwards onto the tape “window” to avoid covering information.
      • Print an additional label if there is an accompanying booklet/leaflet. Place the label on the upper left corner of the booklet/leaflet.
      • Examples of the call number label
mddvd

PR
9199.3
.M617
1998
1 lflt.
mdvid

TL
697
.S3
A67
1995
  • Statistics (on the Non-Books Statistics Sheet)
    • If a matching record found in OCLC, count 1 title/x piece(s) completed as VideoDVD or Videocassettes under row OCLC and Column MD
    • If a matching, different format, or related record found in OCLC, count 1 title /x piece(s) completed as VideoDVD or Videocassettes under row Orig. and Column MD

EXD/DEK 090122; EXD rev. 091103; rev 100201; rev 100208 ; ccm rev 03/06/2015

Videorecording Copy Cataloging (Non-Music, Monographic)

I. Introduction

The chief source of information is the videorecording itself: the credits/title frames (not the box). They may appear at the beginning and/or end of the film. (If there are no credits/title frames, the label on the videotape is the chief source, but this is rare in commercially-produced videos).

Information may be taken from other sources (boxes/containers, accompanying materials, etc.) when it is not available from the credits. The following table shows the prescribed sources for each different type of information in the descriptive part of the record:

Title, statement of responsibility        Chief source

Edition                                                Chief source, accompanying mat.

Publication                                         Chief source, accompanying mat.

Physical description                           Any source Series Chief source, accompanying mat.

Notes                                                  Any source

Numbers (ISBN, etc.)                          Any source

If you take information from somewhere OTHER THAN ITS PRESCRIBED SOURCE (outlined above), that information should be placed [IN BRACKETS].

It’s actually quite simple:

  • Anything in the 245 field (title and statement of responsibility) must be bracketed if it did NOT come from the credits (except the GMD, covered below).
  • The physical description (300), notes (5xx), and standard numbers (020, 028) never need to be bracketed; they can come from anywhere.
  • Other information (edition, publication info, series) should come from EITHER the credits or “accompanying textual material”: scripts, publicity material, booklets, etc. The box or wrapper the videocassette is in is NOT accompanying material, and information from the box should be bracketed if it is being used in title (245), edition (250), publication (260), or series (4xx) fields.

In general, for copy cataloging from good copy, you can accept the data in the record and don’t have to view the credits yourself (you can often check a lot of this information against what’s printed on the box, though; they should match pretty well). However, if the record is very sloppy or incomplete, you should view the video downstairs in the Performing Arts and Media Dept. and take notes on what you see in the credits. You should also view the credits yourself if an authority record for a name or series heading must be established.

II. Does the Record Match?

1. Search record in the library catalog by title and check if it is the correct one. (Occasionally the wrong record has been exported, i.e., the record for the VHS rather than DVD version, or the publication info does not match). If it is, in OCLC Connexion, update holdings by press “F8.” Re-export the record or just type in the catalog date in the library catalog record.

2. If the record is not correct, search in OCLC for the correct record: the best way is searching by the Publisher Number. For example: mn=VM6785D; if no record found or there is no publisher number, 2 use combined search “keyword: DVD” AND “title” or “keyword: VHS” AND “title” respectively for different format.

3. When the correct record is found in OCLC, overlaying the previous bib record by inserting a 949 field: 949 recs=b;ov=.b[insert bib rec. no. here]; (note: there is a “;” at the end of the phrase) Export the record using “F5” (Note: always close the record in the library catalog before the export)

III. Edit the Record in the library catalog

1. Fixed Fields

LANG: Usually “eng”. If a foreign language is involved (the film is in another language and has English subtitles, usually), see the “Lang” field section in Bibliographic Formats and Standards.

LOCATION: should be “md” (Meida)

BIB LVL: “m” (for monograph)

BCODE3: should be “x

MAT TYPE: Should be “g” for videorecordings.

Country: country of publication. Should match the place of publication in $a of the 260 field. Code for U.S. states consists of two-letter postal abbreviation followed by “u,” for example, aru, ksu, nyu. Unknown place (S.l. in 260) is “xx.” For a complete list of codes, see http://www.loc.gov/marc/countries

007 Fixed Field for further Physical Description

Expand this field in the library catalog by positioning the cursor at the 007 and hitting Ctrl + R. The same command will un-expand the field when you are done with it.

Bib Formats gives all the various options for the fields in 007. In the OCLC version (the version given in Bib Formats), the subfields are coded $a, $b, etc. In the library catalog, the names of the subfields are spelled out–or more or less spelled out; they’re still abbreviated (“Mat Catg” for “type of material being cataloged,” etc.).

Here are the subfields and the one-character codes usually found in them:

Mat Catg (OCLC $a): v (videorecording)

Spec Mat ($b): f (videocassette); d (videodisc)

Undefine ($c): this field is now obsolete. Ignore it.

Color ($d): c (color); b (b&w); m (mixed color and black & white)

Format ($e): b for VHS; v for DVD

SoundSep ($f) (Sound on medium or separate): a (sound on medium)

Med Snd ($g) (Medium for sound): h (videotape); i (videodisc)

Dimens ($h): o (½ in. tape); z (other, use this for all videodiscs)

          ConfPlay ($i) (configuration of playback channels): usually s (stereo), m (mono), or u (unknown). This subfield is often left blank, as indicated by a hyphen (“-“) in the library catalog, or just omitted in the OCLC copy, but feel free to fill in the appropriate code (most frequently “u,” unless the container says “stereo” somewhere). The other subfields ($a-$h) are mandatory.

The “quick” way of looking at the 007 codes is to memorize the most common sequence and then be on the lookout for deviations from this pattern: 007 vd cvaizu

008 Further Fixed Fields

Also need to “expand” this field in order to see it in the library catalog (008 does not appear in OCLC; the information is held in the fixed fields that appear at the top of an OCLC record display instead). Many of the subfields are blank.

REC TYPE (OCLC “Type”): g for projected visual media (videos, motion pictures, etc.)

BIB LEVL (BLvl): m for monograph (if s for serial, there is a problem–show to Kate)

ENC LEVL (ELvl): I for full-level records from OCLC; K, M, 8, etc. for lower-level, less full, and maybe not so good records. You shouldn’t change this code, but circle it for Kate if it is anything other than “I”.

CAT FORM (Desc): a for AACR2 as the cataloging standard;

Dat Type (DtSt): this subfield explains certain things about the dates that appear in the following “Date One” and “Date Two” subfields. Common options are:

s = single date (one date only, in Date One)

p = reissue (in new medium, i.e., video vs. motion picture)

r = reissue (re-released in same form as before)

Date One (Dates): the first of two possible dates dealing with the publication of the item. If there is only one date, it goes in this field. If there are 2 dates, the most recent (later) date goes here.

Date Two (Dates): when there are 2 dates, the earlier date goes here.

Run Time (Time): Should match the running time in 300, but in this subfield seconds are rounded up to the next minute (e.g., if the 300 says “10 min., 33 sec.” for the running time, Run Time will round up to “11") and there is space for three digits–so in the example just mentioned, Run Time would be “011" rather than just “11". A 2-hour video would be “120"; all time in this subfield is in minutes.

Audience (Audn): used mainly for educational videos (some LRC materials!). Watch for a 521 Target Audience Note if there is something in this subfield. Options are:

a = preschool

b = primary (K-3)

c = elementary/jr high (4-8)

d = high school (9-12)

e = adult

f = specialized (for people in a particular field, e.g., nurses, teachers)

g = general interest (the field is often just left blank if the film is general interest)

j = juvenile (more general than a, b, or c)

Govt Pub (GPub): indicates if item is a government publication and what level (e.g., state, national, local)

Form Item (Form): ignore

Undefine: ignore

Type Mat (TMat): the specific type of visual material. Options include:

v = videorecording (this is what it should have for videos)

m = motion picture

f = filmstrip

s = slide

Techniq (Tech): film techniques, such as:

l = live action

a = animation

c = animation + live action

Language (Lang): 3-letter codes from USMARC Code List for Languages. There’s space for only one language in this subfield, even if the item includes more (e.g., a Spanish film with English subtitles). Usually just eng, but if other languages are involved there should also be 546 and 041 fields for them (described below), and the “Language” subfield here will include only the code for the main content of the item (the original language of a subtitled film, etc.). They are usually pretty obvious: eng, fre, spa, ger, ita, ara, and so forth. Sign language of any kind is sgn.

Modified (MRec): ignore

Cat Srce (Srce): ignore. Tells what level of library (good, bad, or ugly) input the record.

2. Variable Fields

001 OCLC number. This doesn’t have to be edited, but it’s nice to know where to find it.

020 ISBN (International Standard Book Number)

Indicators are blank. Not every video has an ISBN. If the video has the number, the record should have the 020 field. Should be a 10- or 13-digit number w/out hyphens. Final character can be “X” (uppercase) rather than a number. Subfield $c, price of item, may be present. You can ignore it.

028 Videorecording number/ Manufacturer’s number/ Publisher Number

1st indicator: 4 (videorecording number)

2nd indicator: usually 2, but if there are multiple numbers (as is often the case in a multivolume set), it will be 0, and need to add a 500 note.

Not every video has this number, but if it is on the video it should be put in the record. Enter “$a: the number” as it appears on the piece (including spaces and hyphens), and correct “$b: the publisher” to match the publisher name transcribed in $b of the 260 field.

For example: 028 42 ENR 8390|bFireStar Video

041 Language

Important when the film includes more than one language (including one as subtitles). See Bib Formats for full explanation of 041 and USMARC Code Lists online for 3-letter language codes. The function of the language is indicated by use of the subfields:

$a= language of main content

$b= subtitles or captions (OCLC will convert $b to $j in Visual Materials format records)

$h= language of original (if it is a Japanese film dubbed into English, $a is “eng” and $h is “jap”)

043 Geographic Area Code

Indicators are blank. If the film is about a particular area of the world, this field tells which area (in coded form). Check the Geographic Areas Code list in the USMARC Code Lists (available online) and see Bib Formats for further information.

049 Local Holdings

Indicators are blank. This field will already say “AFUA” as the general designation for our library. Change this to “AFUH” for the Media location.

050/090 Library of Congress Call Number

Indicators are blank. If there is no call number, search for the same title in OCLC for a call no. If there is a call number: Check the library catalog to make sure the no. fit in the system. Use 090 for local assigned no. or adjusted no. from 050. Use the (latest) date in the 260 for date.

1xx   Author (personal or corporate)/Uniform Title Main Entry

100/110 fields are rarely seen with videos.

For 130 field, you need to check its authority record in the library catalog by “title.” If not found, check it in OCLC by “title.” If found in OCLC, export it to the library catalog, if not found, give to the cataloger to create new authority records.

245 Title & Statement of Responsibility

1st indicator: should be 0, for main entry 245.

2nd indicator: number of characters to skip when indexing. “The”=4; “A”=2; etc.

Remember that this information should come from the credits (or video label, if no credits). Brackets indicate that it has been taken from another source (such as the container). However, you can usually accept the information in this field by checking it against the information on the container, and only need to view the video’s credits if you suspect something was transcribed incorrectly.

The 245 field consists of several parts, in the following order:

$a Title (also known as “title proper”)

$h GMD, General Material Designation: “[videorecording]”

$b Remainder of title, if any

$c Statement of responsibility

Punctuation is as follows:

Title proper|h[videorecording] :|bsubtitle /|cstatement of responsibility.

For example: 245 04 The way we dress|h[videorecording] :|bthe meaning of fashion /|cproduced by Learning Seed Film Company.

If there is a parallel title (basically, a translated version of the title), it is:

Title proper|h[GMD] =|bparallel title /|cstatement of responsibility.

For example: 245 04 Das schreckliche Mädchen|h[videorecording] =|bThe nasty girl /|cdirected by blah blah blah...

The parts of 245 in more detail:

Title proper. The title of the work. It may be preceded by some of the credits for certain people (“Cary Grant in ...”) or corporate bodies (“United Artists presents ...”), but this does not matter EXCEPT when the credit is actually within the title (“CBS Special Report”) or is grammatically linked to the title by, say, the use of the possessive (“Jane Austen’s Pride and prejudice”).

GMD. This is always $h [videorecording]

Remainder of title. Used when there is a second part to the title (“Paul Bowles : the complete outsider”). Often you’ll see a difference in the size of the type used, rather than a colon (“CORK FROM PORTUGAL a documentary”) or another variation. Also used for parallel titles (same title, different language), which you’ll see more rarely.

Statement of responsibility. These can be complicated with videos because many people are involved in their production. The statement of responsibility should include only those with some degree of overall responsibility for the content of the video. In other words, producers, directors, and writers, but usually not cast, costumers, music composer, etc. Added entries (700/710 fields) should be entered for these producers/production companies, directors and writers. Other people (such as cast) appear later in the record, in a note (see below).

246 Varying Form of Title

This is used when there is something “funny” about the title: a number or symbol that could be spelled out (&, Æ, etc.); a slightly different form of the title appearing on the container, a portion of the complete title proper may be a more natural title search, etc. Indicators vary. See Bib Formats or the handy 246 Cheat Sheet. The 246 has the same capitalization rules as 245, but don’t include |h[GMD]. Also omit initial articles (the, an, etc.), but do use the |b if you are using a subtitle. There is no statement of responsibility in a 246.

Some common examples:

a. Spelling out numbers, symbols, abbreviations. Indicators are “3_”. 245 00 101 dalmatians|h[videorecording].....

246 3 One hundred and one dalmatians

or 245 00 Guys & dolls|h[videorecording] /|ca musical by Frank Loesser ....

246 3 Guys and dolls

b. Title varies in different physical places. Indicators are “1_”. A |i message explaining where the title appears should be the first part of 246. This message will usually be “Title on container:” or “Title on videocassette label:”. This initial |i is then followed by the |a that has the actual title in it.

245 00 1999 horse judging trials

246 1 |iTitle on container:|aHorse judging trials, 1999

*note that there is no space before the colon in |i here

c. Portion of title from 245. Occasionally, the subtitle of a work may seem a more natural search to people than the first part of the title proper in the 245. Indicators are “30".

245 00 History of the world|h[videorecording] :|bfashion...

(**where “History of the world” is in fact the title of the individual video, not a series title**)

246 30 Fashion

d. Parallel title. Contained in |b in the 245, a parallel title in another language may get its own 246. Indicators are “31"

245 04 Das Boot|h[videorecording] =|bThe boat ...

246 31 Boat

(**notice that the initial article of the parallel title, “The,” has been omitted in the 246**)

250 Edition statement

Indicators are blank. Somewhat rare in videos, but look for phrases such as:

Restored version

Colorized version

25th anniversary edition

Director’s cut

Letterbox format

Something, in other words, that indicates that a special change has been made from the original for this appearance of the film. The word “edition” should be abbreviated to “ed.” and “revised” to “rev.” Use Arabic numberals for spelled-out numbers (“2nd” for “second”).

260 Publication, Distribution, etc.

Indicators are blank.

Usually three subfields: (a) place of publication, (b) name of publisher, (c) date. The record should reflect the publication of the actual video you have in hand. Use the latest date found on either the item, container, or accompanying materials. A small “c” before the date means “copyright.” There may be multiple subfields a & b if another company had a hand in publishing or distributing the video.

Examples:

260 ## Culver City, Calif. :|b United Artists Home Video,|c1998.

260 ## New York, N.Y. :|b New Media Films ;|b [Distributed by] Dog and Pony,|cc1997.

*If no place of publication can be determined, use the abbreviation [S.l.] in brackets.

300 Physical Description

Indicators are blank.

Usually three subfields: (a) extent and type of material (i.e., number of videocassettes, and that it is a videocassette, and its playing time); (b) other physical details, such as color/black & white, sound, etc.; (c) size of tape (not of container).

Examples (note punctuation and abbreviations):

300 ## 1 videocassette (ca. 126 min.) :|bsd., col. ;|c ½ in.

300 ## 2 videodiscs (135 min.) :|bsd., col. ; |c4 3/4 in.

You may see an additional subfield (|e) for “accompanying material.” This can include booklets, leaflets, pamphlets, teacher’s manuals, student guides, textbooks, etc. It can be listed instead in a 500 field (see 500 Accompanying materials) Example:

300 ## 1 videodisc (90 min.) :|bsd., col. ;|c4 3/4 in. +|e1 teacher’s manual.

4xx fields Series Statement

Use 490 and 8xx fields for series data. Use field 490 for series statements transcribed from the item. Use 8xx fields for series added entries.

440 is obsolete now, it should be converted to a 490 1/8XX combination according to Series Authority Procedures for Copy Cataloging. Example:

490 1# The Random House library of knowledge

830 #0 Random House library of knowledge

Note: initial articles are not used in 830 fields. So the second filling indicator of 830 is “0” Search 830 series title in the library catalog by “title”, if couldn’t find, search in OCLC by “title”, if found in OCLC, export it to the the library catalog; if couldn’t find in OCLC, give it to the cataloger to create a new Series Authority record.

The Notes!!!

The 5xx fields are “notes” and can contain a variety of information. Some 5xx’s have special numbers assigned to particular types of data (e.g., 520=summary note, 511=cast/performers, etc.), while other pieces of information are relegated to plain old 500, the “catch-all”. Unlike most fields, 500 can be repeated many times. Each 500 should have only one type of information; in other words, information on the physical format of the video (VHS or Beta), the director (or other statements of responsibility), and the source of the title proper (e.g., from container rather than credits) shouldn’t all be crammed into one 500. But there are a lot of gray areas in notes, which allow for more freedom than most other fields.

Most notes have blank indicators. Only exceptions are noted below.

Notes are supposed to appear in a particular order (see AACR2r), but many records are very sloppy about this and often it’s not really worth taking the time to change the order. If you are putting in new notes, however, or there aren’t many to begin with, try to conform more or less to the order set out below. **This order for notes does NOT put the notes in numberic order by MARC tag, unlike other fields. Here is the correct order:

538 Physical Description/System Details (Mandatory if applicable)

Check for this note in every video record! For physical information not included in the 300. Usually the container has this information printed on the back or the spine. For examples:

538 ## VHS

538 ## DVD ; region 1 ; Dolby digital 2.0 surround ; full frame 1.33:1 ; disc 1 dual layer

500 Nature or form (Optional)

This note is necessary only when it is not obvious from the rest of the description in the record. Most frequently seen: “Documentary,” “Opera in 3 acts,” etc. It tells something about the type of intellectual work the video contains.

546 Language (Mandatory if applicable) Language of sung, spoken, or written content. This includes closed-captioning, which is (usually) indicated on the container with the phrase “closed-captioned for the hearing impaired.” For example:

546 ## Closed-captioned. [this is the current form for this note]

546 ## Dubbed in English 546 ## In French with English subtitles

**NOTE: If you have closed-captioning or audio described video, there should be appropriate subject headings (650s) to indicate this. See below.

500 Source of Title Proper (Mandatory if applicable)

Tells where the title in 245 (not 246!) came from if it wasn’t taken from the chief source of information. For example: 500 Title from container.

511 Cast/Participant/Performer Statement of Responsibility (Mandatory if applicable)

1st indicator: 1 if the note is a list of cast members playing parts. 0 if it isn’t (it might instead be a narrator or presenter).

2nd indicator: blank

Lists important actors, performers, interviewees, hosts, etc. The key word is “important”; we don’t need to list every single actor that appeared in a film. Generally the first few are sufficient (they are the ones who will get top billing in the film’s credits, and probably get their names listed on the blurb on the container, too). A host, presenter, or narrator of a documentary is important.

**If you’re not listing cast (and therefore using and indicator of “0"), you need to indicate what the person did.

For examples: 511 1# Peter Sellers, George Scott.

The indicator tells the computer to show the public note as “Cast: Peter Sellers, George Scott.”

511 0# John Hart, narrator.

Added entries (700/710 fields) are necessary for people listed in the 511. See the section on 700/710 below for more information.

508 Additional Statement of Responsibility (Credits) (Mandatory if applicable)

For people not quite important enough to appear in 245|c, but who are still important enough to be mentioned in the record. Remember that 245|c is for people with overall importance: directors, producers, writers. 508 is for people who play a more limited role, preferably in this order:

(**bold indicates “added entry for this person”–700/710**)

1) Artistic director

2) photographers, camera, cinematographer/director of photography

3) editors, film editors

4) music (composers or directors)

5) consultants, advisors

6) executive producers

7) scriptwriters/screenwriters, screenplay author (as opposed to just “writer”, who goes in the 245|c)

This list isn’t complete, and 508 has a lot of grey areas. For example, we list costumers and set designers for musical videos (like operas and ballets), but usually not for other videos. BUT if the costumer seems particularly important for an individual film–as in Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, which won an award for its costumes–then listing the costume designer in the 508 is a good idea. If the film is animated, we want to list the animator, but we may choose to put him/her in the 245|c instead of 508 if most or all of the film is animated and his/her role is therefore of overall importance.

The role (or function) of each person in the 508 should be indicated before the name or group of names. For example:

508 ## Director of photography, Samuel Smiler ; editor, June Harvey ; music, Alison Webb ; executive producer, Bill Blast.

Note that there’s a semicolon with a space on either side between the different “functions” (editor, executive producer, etc.).

Who gets added entries (700/710 fields) and who doesn’t can also be flexible, but the guidelines given in the list above should help. Unlike 511 and 245, not everyone in 508 necessarily gets an added entry field. See the 700/710 section below.

500 Edition/History (General) (Mandatory if applicable)

This can tell various details about multiple dates associated with the item:

500 ##Dates vary: in credits, c1975; on container, c1979.

Or, about the original production/release of the film, usually as a motion picture rather than a video:

500 ## Originally produced as a motion picture in 1939.

Or, to indicate that the content of the film is somehow related to something else that previously existed:

500 ## Remake of the 1933 motion picture of the same name.

500 ## Based on the play: The dolls’ house / Henrik Ibsen. [note that the format of this one resembles a 245 title / statement of responsibility!]

500 Accompanying Material (Mandatory if applicable)

For information on accompanying materials that is not listed in 300|e. For examples:

500 ## Scene index inserted in container

500 ## Booklet with chapter guide, cast and credits (5 p.) inserted in container

Note: enter related information at the “Message” column of the item. i.e.: 1 lflt., 1 bklt.

521 Target Audience (Optional) Indicators can be blank; there are other options for indicator 1.

Can indicate anything about the intended audience: grade level, film rating, etc., as described in the item itself or its container/accompanying material (in other words, don’t make up the information if it isn’t written there already). See also “Audience” fixed subfield in 008. Examples:

521 ## MPAA rating: R.

521 ## Not rated.

520 Summary (Mandatory) Obviously, a summary of the video’s content. If the record has a 520, read through it for typos. If there is no 520 in the record, give it to the cataloger to write a new one.

505 Contents (Mandatory if applicable)

1st indicator: 0 for full contents of item; 1 for incomplete contents (we don’t have all of the item’s parts, so we aren’t sure what their contents are); 2 for partial contents (we have all of the items in hand but don’t want to list all of its contents in the 505).

2nd indicator: usually blank.

This can be used when you want to list titles of individual videos in a multi-video set, or titled segments of a single video, or chapters or essays in a book, etc. Access to these individual titles can be provided in 740 fields, though this isn’t always necessary.

Punctuation is as follows:

505 0# Title of first part / author (playing time) -- Title of second part : subtitle of second part / author (playing time) -- Title of third part / author (playing time).

That’s actually a double dash, not a single hyphen, between titles. Authors usually won’t be listed in a 505 for videos, and neither will playing time, so the note may have just titles. For example:

505 0# The world of the slug -- Crustaceans and their kin -- Jellyfish : Atlantic Ocean -- Jellyfish : Pacific Ocean.

500 Numbers

Indicators are blank.

For numbers other than those in 020 or 028 with (in the latter case) second indicator “2". If 028 has 2nd indicator “0", then you should make a 500 for that number or group of numbers. Format is: 500 Publisher’s name: number, number. For example:

500 ## Walt Disney Home Videos: WD 3587, WD 742, WD 8912.

6xx Subject Headings

  • Add “655 #7 Feature films $2 lcgft” if it is not in the record. (Use “short films” if <40 minutes long)
  • Add “655 #7 Documentary films $2 lcgft” for documentaries
  • Delete headings “Foreign films,” “Motion pictures, French [etc.],” and “Foreign language films”
  • Add another “655 #7 Feature films|z[Country name] $2 local” if it is a foreign film. (use “short films” if less than 40 minutes long) 
  • Add “655 #7 Video recordings for the hearing impaired $2 lcgft” if there is a “546 Closed-captioned”
  • Check 600 and 610 headings in the library catalog by “author,” if not found, check them in OCLC by “personal names” and “Corporate names” respectively. If found in OCLC, export them to the library catalog, if not found, give to the cataloger to create new authority records.
  • Add "690 ## FormatVideo" for Videocassette and DVDs
  • Add "690 ## FormatDVD" for DVDs
  • Add "690 ## FormatStreamingVideo" if applicable
  • Add “690 ## bookplate: [name]” note upon request

7xx Added Entries

These fields are for access to names and titles. The most common you’ll see will be 700, 710, and 740. Names (700,710) should be checked in the authority file. 740 titles are not.

Check 700 and 710 headings in the library catalog by “author,” if not found, check them in OCLC by “personal names” and “Corporate names” respectively. If found in OCLC, export them to the library catalog, if not found, give to the cataloger to create new authority records. Delete unnecessary 700/710 fields.

700 Personal Name

1st indicator: almost always 1 (surname, first name) 2nd indicator: blank

The name should match the authority record.

710 Corporate Name 

1st indicator: usually 2 (name in direct order), sometimes 1 (jurisdiction name first, like “Exeter Chemicals. Research Unit” rather than “Research Unit” first)

2nd indicator: blank

As with 700, authority checking must be done. For example:

710 2 Exeter Chemicals.|bResearch Unit.

730 Uniform Title

1st indicator: number of nonfiling characters (0-9)

2nd indicator: usually blank; 2 if the title in the 740 is a work contained by the larger work.

740 Title Added Entry for Uncontrolled/Related Title

1st indicator: always 0 for number of non-filing (“skip”) characters (initial articles are omitted from titles in 740s)

2nd indicator: usually blank; 2 if the title in the 740 is a work contained by the larger work (like the individual songs on an album, or essays in a book. Rare in videos).

740s turn up with some frequency in videos, but usually they are 246s in disguise and should probably be changed to 246s. Sometimes they give access to titles listed in a 505 (Contents) note. These are not always necessary and sometimes Jason may tell you to delete them.

8xx Series Added Entries

Indicators are usually #0

See section on 4xx above for more information on 8xx (especially 830)

945 Initials

Item Records and Physical Processing

See “Expedited Processing of Popular Video” and “Processing DVDs/Videos” for detailed instructions

Statistics

See “Expedited Processing of Popular Video” for instruction.

Review

Give videos to the catalogers to review before label printing.

kmk9/25/00;minor updates1/4/01;bookplates added8/7/02; exd revised 12/18/09; minor update 1/12/10; ccm rev 03/10/2015

How to Search for Videorecordings in OCLC

1. Make sure you are in the bibliographic database (OL in upper right-hand corner) rather than the authority file (AF).

2. Search by the following: ISBN, if present. The 10-digit number is located on the top edge of the UPC barcode. Neither this barcode nor an ISBN is necessarily present on a video. The last digit is sometimes the letter “X” but this doesn’t affect searching.

Search command: type the ISBN and send (F11). Do not input spaces or hyphens. Videorecording number/Manufacturer’s number, if present. The number is usually a combination of letters and numbers a few digits long. It’s usually located on the “spine” of the video container, sometimes on the back of the container.

Search command: mn: followed by the first 2 alphabetic letters and up to 10 numberic digits. Example: mn:QV2424. Title of video with a sca ti command (sca ti blah blah blah, leaving out punctuation and the GMD). This will pull up a list of titles that fall around your exact search. Be aware of subtitles both on the piece (that may not appear in a record) or in a record (that may not appear on the piece, or at least on the container).

3. Determine if the record is (more or less) a match.

Check the following: 020, 028 Standard numbers (ISBN and videorecording number), if present. Should match exactly, except for spacing/hyphens.

245 Title though this may not necessarily be an exact match. The statement of responsibility ($c) is especially likely to show discrepancies, but even the title may be a little different. If the record still seems to be describing the same film, continue. 250 Edition should match if present.

260 Publication information should more or less match, but, like the 245, there is room for question here. Don’t reject a record based solely on differences in the 260.

300 Physical description. Certain elements should match your video exactly: the number of pieces (e.g., 5 videos) and the specific format (videocassette rather than videodisc or DVD). Other elements (playing time, tape width, etc.) can be ignored.

4. Print those records that you didn’t eliminate in step 3. Circle the specific problems (e.g., differences in title) and show them to Jason.

kmk9/5/00 ; minor updates ccm3/11/2015

ROUTING OF NEW VIDEORECORDINGS TO CATALOGING

New videorecordings in any format (videocassettes, DVDs, etc.) are, for purposes of routing to Cataloging, divided into two categories: music and non-music.

Music videos

This includes videorecordings of musical performances such as operas, symphony concerts, musicals, etc.; also teaching videos or “workshops” with musicians; also biographies of musicians or documentaries on any aspect of music. Music videos go to Cathy Reineke in Music Cataloging. They should be placed on her chair or on her desk (if there is room). They should not go on any shelves in the Music Cataloging area (though you may see some videos on shelves there).

Non-music videos

This includes everything not falling into the music categories listed above. Non-music videos go to the Special Formats unit (Jason Dean and Cedar Middleton). Videos may be given directly to Jason or Cedar, especially if they are “Rush” titles.  If you are unsure about a particular video (whether it is music or non-music), feel free to ask Cathy or Jason, or to leave it for either one if they are not present.

kmk1/17/2002 ; rev. ccm3/11/2015

Audiocassette or Audio CDs Copy Cataloging (Spoken Recordings)

I. Introduction: Chief Source

The chief source of information for an audiocassette or CD is the cassette or CD and any label stuck on the cassette or on the CDs. In some cases, you can also count container/insert as the chief source; that is, when there is no collective title on the cassette/CD itself and there is one on the container (box) or insert (little leaflet) or any other accompanying textual material.

But usual practice is:

Title, statement of responsibility  Chief source

Edition Chief source, accompanying mat., container

Publication Chief source, accompanying mat., container

Physical description Any source

Series Chief source, accompanying mat., container

Notes Any source

Numbers (ISBN, etc.) Any source

As with videotapes or DVDs, if you take information from somewhere other than the prescribed source (outlined above), the information should be placed [IN BRACKETS]. But, note the exception about collective titles in the first paragraph above. And notice that with audiotapes, only the title and statement of responsibility (245) are limited to coming from the chief source. In other words, it’s rare you would have to bracket anything on audiotapes.

II. Does the Record Match?

Make sure the record in the library catalog is the correct one: check physical description (300), standard numbers (020, 028), title (245), and edition (250, if present) especially. OCLC searching is similar to videos (ISBN, manufacturer’s number, scan title); see How to Search for Videorecordings in OCLC. Exporting and overlaying a record is also the same (see How to Export a Record from OCLC). Once you have the correct record in the library catalog, edit the record.

III. Editing the Record

A. Fixed Fields *These are instructions for editing fixed fields in an the library catalog display. The OCLC display looks somewhat different with regard to fixed fields.

LANG: Should be the 3-letter code for the language of the main content of the item (usually“eng”). Should match the “Language” subfield of 008, and the first language code that appears in 041 (if there is an 041 field).

LOCATION: “md"

BIB LVL: “m” for monograph

BCODE3: Initially blank; you should put “x” in this field

SKIP: Sets the number of non-filing characters for the title (245) in our system. Should match the 2nd indicator of 245. the library catalog fills it in automatically.

CAT DATE: Enter today’s date

MAT TYPE: “i” for non-music sound recordings. The code for recorded music is “j,” but these should be going to the Music Cataloging Unit, so show any “j” to Jason.

COUNTRY: The place of publication. Should match the first place named at the beginning of 260 and the “Country” subfield of 008. 008 uses the 3-letter MARC codes found in USMARC Code List for Countries (available online). 260 may include a city but the fixed fields use only countries and states of the US & UK.

007 Fixed Field for Further Physical Description

You will need to “expand” this field to be able to see it in the library catalog (in OCLC it looks different). In full-screen edit, position the cursor at the 007 and hit Ctrl + X. The same command will un-expand the field when you are done with it. Bib Formats gives all the various options for the fields in 007. In the OCLC version (the version given in Bib Formats), the subfields are coded $a, $b, etc. In the library catalog, the names of the subfields are spelled out–or more or less spelled out; they’re still abbreviated (“Mat Catg” for “type of material being cataloged,” etc.). Here are the subfields and the one-character codes usually found in them:

Mat Catg (OCLC $a): s (sound recording)

Spec Mat ($b): s (sound cassette) ; d (sound disc)

Undefine ($c): this field used to mean something, but is now obsolete, so the library catalog calls it “Undefined” and OCLC doesn’t always include it. Ignore it.

Speed ($d): l (1 7/8 inches per second; standard for audiocassettes) ; f (1.4 m. per second (discs))

ConfPlay ($e) (Configuration of playback channels): m (monoaural) ; s (stereophonic); u (unknown–if “stereo” or “mono” is not specified on the item, do not guess! Use “u”)

Groove W ($f) (Groove width or pitch): n (not applicable)

Dimens ($g) : j (standard size for audiocassettes) ; g (standard size for discs)

TapWidth ($h) (tape width): l (1/8 in. tape) ; n (not applicable ; use for discs)

TapeConf ($i) (Tape configuration): c (quarter track, as opposed to 8-track, etc.) ; n (not applicable ; use for discs) again no need for CDs

KindDisc ($j) (Kind of disc,cylinder,or tape) : m for “mass-produced” commercial tape.

KindMat ($k) (Kind of material) : n (not applicable; use for discs)

KindCut ($l) (Kind of cutting): n (not applicable; for discs) S P Char ($m) (Special playback characteristics) : c for “Dolby-B” recording is fairly common. Use u for “unknown” if there is no Dolby symbol on the tape or container.

Cap/Stor ($n) (Capture and storage technique) : usually e for analog capture and storage on tape or d for digital recordings (not for digital playback, like compact discs, however). U for unknown is also possible but you can assume e for those tapes that do not say “digital tape recording” or something similar on them.

008 Further Fixed Fields

You will also need to “expand” this field in order to see it in the library catalog (008 does not appear in OCLC; the information is held in the fixed fields that appear at the top of an OCLC record display instead). Many of the subfields will be blank, which is normal. Some can be ignored; they have been indicated below in normal rather than bold type, though I’ve explained what you might see in those subfields anyway.

REC STAT: ignore; usually n for “new”

REC TYPE (OCLC “Type”): i for non-musical sound recording

BIB LEVL (BLvl): m for monograph (if s for serial, there is a problem–show to Kate)

ENC LEVL (ELvl): I for full-level records from OCLC; K, M, 8, etc. for lower-level, less full, and maybe not so good records. You shouldn’t change this code, but circle it for Jason if it is anything other than “I”.

CAT FORM (Desc): ignore, but if you want to know: a for AACR2 as the cataloging standard; i or a blank indicates something else. It’s rare that you’ll see anything other than “a” for videos, and you don’t need to change this.

ARC CTRL: ignore.

Date Ent: ignore. Tells the date the record was entered into OCLC (yy/mm/dd)

Dat Type (DtSt): this subfield explains certain things about the dates that appear in the following “Date One” and “Date Two” subfields. Usually will be s = single date (one date only, in Date One). Date One (Dates): the first of two possible dates dealing with the publication of the item. If there is only one date, it goes in this field. If there are 2 dates, the most recent (later) date goes here. Date Two (Dates): when there are 2 dates, the earlier date goes here.

Country (Ctry): country of publication. Should match the place of publication in 260. A 3-letter code coming from the USMARC Code List for Countries (available online). U.S. locations are always the postal abbreviation for the state (or “dc” for Washington, D.C.) plus “u” (e.g., aru, ksu, nyu, cau). U.S. in general (no city or state specified) is xxu. Unknown place (S.l. in 260) is “xx” [Several “Undefine” fields]

Audience (Audn): used mainly for educational or juvenile materials (often for LRC). Watch for a 521 Target Audience Note if there is something in this subfield. Options are:

a = preschool

b = primary (K-3)

c = elementary/jr high (4-8)

d = high school (9-12)

e = adult

f = specialized (for people in a particular field, e.g., nurses, teachers)

g = general interest (though the field is often just left blank if the film is4 general interest, and that’s fine)

j = juvenile (more general than a, b, or c)

Undefine: ignore

Govt Pub (GPub): indicates if item is a government publication and what level (e.g., state, national, local) Form Item (Form): ignore

Undefine: ignore

Acc Mat (AccM): accompanying material. There are 6 places provided for Acc Mat. This code usually reflects the intellectual content of printed material (leaflet, booklet, liner notes, whatever) that come with the cassette. Don’t worry about adding these if they aren’t already in the record. Options include:

a = discography

b = bibliography

d = libretto or text/lyrics

e = biography of author

i = historical information

r = instructional materials

s = printed music

LitText (LTxt): type of literary text on the recording. There are 2 spaces provided for this code. See attached sheet for list of the codes available.

Language (Lang): 3-letter codes from USMARC Code List for Languages. There’s space for only one language in this subfield, even if the item includes more. Usually just eng, but if other languages are involved there should also be 546 and 041 fields for them (described below), and the “Language” subfield here will include only the code for the main content of the item. They are usually pretty obvious: eng, fre, spa, ger, ita, ara, and so forth.

Modified (MRec): ignore

Cat Srce (Srce): ignore. Tells what level of library (good, bad, or ugly) input the record.

B. Variable Fields

001 OCLC number. Does not need editing, but this is where it’s located.

020 ISBN Indicators are blank. Not every audiotape has one. If it does, or an accompanying book does, all ISBNs should have separate 020 fields. Enter the 10-digit number w/out hyphens or spaces. Final character may be “X” (uppercase). Ignore any |c (price).

028 Manufacturer’s number / Publisher’s number 1st indicator: 0 (“issue number”) 2nd indicator: usually 2. See videocassettes procedure for exceptions. As with ISBN, not every audiocassette has this number, but if it is on the item, it should be in the record. The number should be entered as it appears on the piece (including spaces and hyphens). There should be a |b for the publisher’s name (matching |b of the 260). For example:

028 02 LM 2398 |b Lark in the Morning Media

041 Language 1st indicator: 0=item includes no translation; 1=item is a translation 2nd indicator: blank Most audiocassettes will be just English, and will get no 041 but should have “eng” in the two Language fixed fields. However, if spoken/sung text on the cassette includes another language, you will need an 041 field. In that case: ***The main language of the item for a sound recording does NOT go in |a. There is no |a; use |d (Language of sung or spoken text) as the first subfield!!**** Accompanying textual material’s language goes in |g. Translations also get |h to indicate the original language.

043 Geographic Area Code Indicators are blank Same as for videocassettes. See the USMARC Code Lists and Bib Formats.

049 Local Holdings

Indicators are blank. This field will already say “AFUA” as the general designation for our library. You will need to change this to the more specific code for the appropriate location. For Media: AFUH ; For Fine Arts: AFUC

050/090 Library of Congress Call Number

Indicators are blank. If there is no call number, write “call #” on record printout and give to Jason when you have finished editing the rest of the record. If there is a call number: Check the library catalog to make sure the Cutter will allow it to file in correct alphabetical order. Cutter number comes from the main entry (either 100/110, or 245). See Cutter Numbers handout for more information. Use the (latest) date in the 260 for date.

1xx Author (personal or corporate)/Uniform Title Main Entry

Unlike videos, a 1xx field is quite likely to appear in audiocassttes. The author of the content of the tape is considered the author of the entire tape. It’s true that additional people helped make the tape, but sound recordings are (I suppose) considered to be more like an alternative version of the original work (usually a book) rather than as a whole new entity created by a lot of people working together equally. Anyway, 1xx provides access to the author of a work; it is parallel to 700 and 600 fields, and therefore needs to be checked in the authority file. There are 2 types of 1xx you are likely to see: 100 and 110.

100 Main Entry–Personal Name 1st indicator: usually 1 (for surnames coming first) but 0 if the person has only first names6 (like “Madonna”) 2nd indicator: blank The name of the first individual considered the author of the content. They should also be listed as the first author in 245|c. If there are multiple authors (all of whom will be listed in 245|c), only the first goes in 100; the others go into separate 700 fields. Remember that what’s in 100 should match the heading for this individual in the OCLC and the library catalog authority files. *when you check the authority record for 100 authors, see if the authority record includes a call number. For literary authors, this is not uncommon. Write the number somewhere on the record for Jason to see if it is there.

110 Main Entry–Corporate Name 1st indicator: 1 (jurisdiction name first) or 2 (name in direct order). Just make sure it matches the authority heading. 2nd indicator blank. A corporate body treated as an author; parallel to 710 and 610. Again, remember to check the authority file for an exact match.

2xx Title Entries

You are already familiar with 245 from videocassettes. Occasionally you will see 240s with audiocassettes; they appear when a uniform title (basically, the authorized form of a title, just like personal and corporate names have authorized forms) is required. Most works don’t need uniform titles, but they are frequently necessary for: Translated works Musical works (which you won’t see) Works that have appeared in many different versions, due to translations, revisions and alternate versions, and to their age (like the Bible or Koran, or Arabian Nights, or Mother Goose, or Beowulf, or Shakespeare’s plays) Uniform titles, like authority headings for names, give us a way to pull together the variant versions of these very common or problematic works. You won’t see many 240s, but it’s possible that LRC may have Bible stories or Mother Goose rhymes on tape. So: 240 Uniform Title 1st indicator: 1 (basically meaningless, but required) 2nd indicator: number of nonfiling characters to skip when indexing (as in 245) The uniform title does NOT need to appear on the piece! It is an access point, not a description taken from the item itself. It comes from the authority file. Usually you will have only |a. For example: 240 10 Mother Goose No punctuation should end 240 unless it ends w/an abbreviation.

245 Title & Statement of Responsibility

1st indicator: 1 if there is a 1xx main entry; 0 if not7 2nd indicator: number of characters to skip when indexing. “The”=4; “A”=2; “An”=3, etc. Remember that this information should come from the outside of the audiocassette. Brackets indicate that it has been taken from another source (such as accompanying text). The 245 field consists of several parts, in the following order:

$a Title (also known as “title proper”)

$h GMD, General Material Designation: “[sound recording]”

$b Remainder of title, if any

$c Statement of responsibility

Punctuation is as follows: Title proper|h[GMD] :|bsubtitle /|cstatement of responsibility.

For example: 245 04 The Eustace diamonds|h[sound recording] :|ba novel of intrigue /|cby Alexander Trollope.

Note: The GMD is always $h [sound recording]. Also note about the Statement of responsibility: the PERFORMER on the audiocassette (actor, reader, whatever) is usually NOT put in 245|c. Only the authors of the INTELLECTUAL CONTENT of the work are in 245. Readers/performers/cast go into 511.

246 Varying Form of Title

This is used when there is something “funny” about the title: a number or symbol that could be spelled out (&, Æ, etc.); a slightly different form of the title appearing on the container, a portion of the complete title proper may be a more natural title search, etc. Indicators vary. See Bib Formats or the handy 246 Cheat Sheet. The 246 has the same capitalization rules as 245, but don’t include |h[GMD]. Also omit initial articles (the, an, etc.), but do use the |b if you are using a subtitle. There is no statement of responsibility in a 246. Some common examples:

a. Spelling out numbers, symbols, abbreviations. Indicators are “3_”.

245 00 101 dalmatians|h[sound recording]....

246 3 One hundred and one dalmatians

or 245 00 Guys & dolls|h[sound recording] /|ca story by Damon Runyon .... 246 3 Guys and dolls

b. Title varies in different physical places. Indicators are “1_”. A |i message explaining where the title appears should be the first part of 246. This message will usually be “Title on container:” or “Title on accompanying leaflet:”. This initial |i is then followed by the |a that has the actual title in it.

245 00 1978 presidential debates

246 1 |iTitle on accompanying booklet:|aPresidential debates of 1978 *note that there is no space before the colon in |i here

c. Portion of title from 245.

Occasionally, the subtitle of a work may seem a more natural search to people than the first part of the title proper in the 245. Indicators are “30".

245 00 History of the world|h[sound recording] :|bcenturies of something

246 30 Centuries of something

d. Parallel title. Contained in |b in the 245, a parallel title in another language may get its own 246. Indicators are “31"

245 04 Das Boot|h[sound recording] =|bThe boat ...

246 31 Boat (**notice that the initial article of the parallel title, “The,” has been omitted in the 246**)

250 Edition Statement

This should be very rare with audiocassttes, though you may see “unabridged” or “abridged” on audiobooks. Check with Jason if it is confusing.

260 Publication, Distribution, etc.

Indicators are blank. Similar to videos, though you won’t usually have to bracket anything in this field–we’re allowed to use containers and accompanying material for audiocassttes. But the general ideas are the same. If multiple publisher’s names are listed, prefer names printed on the actual cassette and consider omitting others. As for videos, the |c date should reflect the date of the piece in hand as a whole, not of the original content of the item, or an earlier publication of the tape form. A small letter “p” before a date is the “pressing” date of the recording and is similar to the “c” that indicates copyright.

300 Physical Description

Indicators are blank. Usually only two subfields for audiocassettes (unless |e is present for accompanying materials). Subfield a is used for extent of the item and its specific format and playing time; |b for other technical details such as analog/digital sound, Dolby processing, etc. Dimensions for standard-sized cassette tapes are considered standard and therefore do not need to be given at all! Also, if no playing time is stated on the item, just leave it out. For example:

300 1 sound cassette (ca. 90 min.) :|banalog, Dolby processed.

300 1 sound disc (120 min.) ;|bdigital, stereo.

300 3 sound cassettes (360 min.) :|bdigital, stereo.

300 3 sound discs (4 hrs., 30 min.) :|bdigital, MP3 file.

Accompanying material is the same as for videos: put in |e (preceded by +) and list the type of material and further details if necessary:

300 2 sound cassettes (115 min.) :|b analog +|e1 book (32 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.)

4xx Series

See video procedure. Don’t forget the 490/830 pair.

5xx Notes

As with videos, some notes are 500, some are more specific. You are already familiar with some.

546 Language If necessary. Also check 041 and fixed fields. Unlikely to appear w/audiocassettes.

511 Cast/Participant/Performer Statement of Responsibility 1st indicator: 1 if the note is a list of cast members playing parts. 0 if it isn’t (it might instead be a narrator or presenter). 2nd indicator: blank Lists important actors, performers, readers, interviewees, hosts, etc. Usually we don’t have to worry about there being very many. If the work is just a book being read by one or more actors, use 1st indicator 1 (for “cast”) and you may list the parts played by each actor after his/her name (if only one person read the whole thing, put just his/her name). For example:

511 1 Joel Grey. 511 1 Cindy Plunkett (Violet), Arthur Sanders (Duke, Mr. Scales), Adriana Washboard (Patience Crabstick) Make sure there are added entries (700s) for these people.

500 Edition/History Similar to videos.

500 Accompanying Material Similar to videos

521 Target Audience Similar to videos.

LRC tapes are often storybooks read aloud and will have an age group listed. Be sure to check the 008 “Audience” subfield and add the appropriate code (“j” is the general juvenile one if the more specific grade ranges don’t seem appropriate).

520 Summary

Check for misspellings if there is a 520; if none, give to Jason to write one.

505 Contents 1st indicator: 0=full contents; 1=incomplete contents (if rest of item is missing); 2=partial contents (we are too lazy to list all of them even though they are in front of us) 2nd indicator: usually blank A useful note to have for tapes of stories for LRC. If the tape is a reading of a single book, don’t bother to list chapter contents, but separate stories or poems should be listed in 505.

500 Numbers Similar to videos

6xx Subject Headings

Jason will check most of these for now, but NAME headings (600 or 610) you can check in the authority file just as if they were 700/710 names. The headings should match exactly. including $t (title of work) subfields–we may have to set up authority records for the author-title ($t) record even if the author already has a

7xx Added Entries

Same as videos but fewer in number (usually). If the tape is a reading (or dramatization) of a book, we already have a 100 for the book’s author and don’t need an additional 700. We do need 700s for actors/readers/performers/whatever they are called, unless there are a ridiculously large number of them named (in those cases, ask Jason). If the tape is a roundtable discussion, conference, or interview, make 700s for all participants. 710s should be made for the publisher of audiobooks and the presenter/publisher of roundtables/conferences. If in doubt, ask Jason; added entries for audiotape publishers are standard practice the way they are for videos.

8xx Series Added Entry Fields

See information on 4xx above for information on the 8xx family (esp. 830, the most common).

945 Local stuff: Catalogers’ Initials

Indicators are blank our initials:

945 dmj / kmk **You are finished with the Bibliographic record.

Now for the Item record:

*** Go to Summary. Make sure there isn’t already an item record existing (if so, edit the existing item record rather than creating a new one). If not, attach a new item record. 

There isn’t a real template for audiocassettes or audio discs so you will just use catnew for a new item record and the prompts will take you through a new item record.

Hit Enter at the “Copy” prompt (unless this piece is NOT copy 1)

Type 12 for item type for audiocassettes  or 53 for item type for AV books at IType prompt

Type mdcte for Media audiocassettes or mdbk for media discs

Status is available

If more than one volume add the number when prompted, for example: v.1, v.2, etc.

Stick a barcode on the back of the container. Scan the barcode.

You are done!!! Count statistics.

You have edited one bib record, created (or possibly edited) one item record, and exported or created any number of authority records. Give to Jason to review (and add call number, etc.). Include any paperwork such as authority workforms, the original record printout, printouts of alternative OCLC records, etc. Jason will check your work, add what’s necessary, and put it on the labeling table for Rose. Rose will then put it on the shelf to be taken to Media.

ccm rev. 3/12/2015

Cataloging Kits

A kit is a collection of materials in which no one item predominates. This “egalitarian” aspect is what defines the item as a kit rather than, say, a video with an accompanying teacher’s guide and workbook, or a book with an accompanying CD-ROM. Kits are most frequently seen in the education field (for LRC) but occasionally may be in other subject areas and may go to Media. Don’t confuse the work’s bibliographic identity as a kit with its item record identity as a kit (I Type 17, location mdkit). Occasionally we will assign kit item records to a piece whose bibliographic record is NOT a kit, at least for Media materials. This procedure deals primarily with materials that are bibliographically considered kits. The cataloging of kits is similar to the cataloging of other materials. Only major differences are outlined below.

Chief Source of Information

Any part of a kit may be used as the source of information for any type of data (245, 260, etc.). Usually the box that holds the entire kit will have a collective title for the kit on it, and perhaps publication information as well.

Fixed Fields (Don’t forget to fill in BCODE3 and CAT DATE fields as usual)

Mat Type: (Type fixed field in OCLC) o for “kits”

Location should be "md"

007 may be present IF the kit includes something that would ordinarily require the 007 field (video, sound recording, CD-ROM). The 007 will correspond to that type of material–in other words, there is no special 007 for the kit itself, just the usual options for videos, audiocassettes, etc.

008 the only unusual thing for kits is the Type Mat subfield (near the bottom). It should be coded b for “kits”

Variable Fields

245 Title

Like videos, kits will usually have a title main entry, in which case the 1st indicator for 245 will be “0.” Remember that the title for a kit can come from anywhere and does not need to be bracketed. A statement of responsibility for the kit as a whole is probably rare; don’t be too surprised if there is simply no |c in the 245 at all. The GMD [kit] should be contained in |h, before the |b. For example: 245 04 The shadow of hate|h[kit] :|ba history of intolerance in America.

246 Varying Forms of Titles

Be on the lookout for variant titles–check the container, the spine or sides of the container, and the individual pieces. Variant titles on individual pieces may or may not justify a 246–they may instead get a 500 note (“Title on video: Blah blah blah ...”) and a 740 added entry. A variant form of the title of the entire kit should get a 246 and a title of an individual part should get the 500/740 treatment, but ask Kate when you are unsure.

260 Publication, Distribution, etc.

Same as for other materials, but remember that the information can come from anywhere. Be on the lookout for varying dates on different parts of the item–we may need to assign an overall “assumed” date for when the kit as a whole was published if its individual parts have differing copyright dates themselves.

300 Physical Description

This is quite different from other materials. The full instructions are in AACR2 1.10C2. There are three options for describing kits (condensed, expanded, and vague): Condensed Use one 300 and list each type of material and the number of each type. You may also list the presence and size of a container. Note that there is no |b, just |a and |c. For example:

300 12 slides, 1 sound cassette, 3 filmstrips, 1 teacher’s guide, 2 maps ;|cin container 18 x 25 x 19 cm.

Expanded Use multiple 300s (one for each type of material you describe) and format each individual 300 as you would a normal 300 (subfields a, b, and c when appropriate). If you describe a container, it gets its own 300 (the final one). For example:

300 12 slides :|bcol. 300 1 sound cassette (46 min.) :|banalog, stereo. 300 3 filmstrips (112 fr.) :|bcol. ;|c35 mm. 300 1 teacher’s guide (vi, 46 p.) :|bcol. ill.; |c28 cm.

300 All in container 18 x 25 x 19 cm.

Vague Use one 300 and give a very general assessment of what the kit contains. You may mention the container and its dimensions. This is for kits with a lot of little bitty things that would be too much of a pain to list individually. For example:

300 57 various pieces ;|cin box 20 x 12 x 6 cm.

Or 300 various pieces

Note that in all of the above 300s, listing the container and its dimensions is optional. Omitting it from a record is not necessarily wrong, but we had may as well put it in. Dimensions are listed in the order height x width x depth (it is our guess as to which direction is which, apparently).

Other Variable Fields

Other fields will really be similar to those in records for other materials–check series statements,3 access points, notes, etc. There may be notes describing individual parts of the kit (for instance, giving the credits from a video, or a 538 for “VHS” or CD-ROM system requirements). Remember that with kits, the key concept is flexibility. A kit itself is frequently a weird mishmash of materials, and its record may appear to be the same. There’s unusual flexibility in the records due to title sources, 300 options, etc., and notes may contain any sort of information that elaborates on what the kit contains or its intended use. Just keep in mind that the purpose of the record is to help people find the piece and figure out what it contains.

Item Record

Go through the usual item record editing/creation steps.

I Type = 17 (kits) Location = mdkit (Media kits)

Insert the barcode field and scan barcode. There will be only one barcode for the entire kit. Usually you can stick it on the outside of the box that contains the kit.

Insert a message field stating how many parts are in the item and what kinds of part (e.g., “3 discs, 4 bklts.”). 

Count statistics, Give to Jason for review or on the labeling table if your work has already been reviewed.

kmk10/12/00 ; ccm rev. 3/12/2015

Cataloging CD-ROMs

Catalog records for CD-ROMs are similar to those for other materials. Only differences or particularly important points are outlined below. AACR2 devotes Chapter 9 to the description of “Computer Files” (including CD-ROMs).

Chief Source of Information

Theoretically, the chief source of information for CD-ROMs is the title screens (similar to videos). However, AACR2 specifies that you may use other areas, such as the container or the surface of the disk itself, if information is lacking in the title screens OR if access to those screens is not available–in other words, if we can’t mount the things on our machines, we are allowed to use the disk surface, container, etc. as the chief source. Like kits, therefore, CDROMs rarely have bracketing in their records–we can take information from wherever we choose. AACR2 also says to prefer the area that has the most complete information; if the disk’s surface has little printed on it, use the container instead.

Fixed Fields

Mat Type (Type in OCLC): This is tricky. Former practice was to always code m for “computer files” here. Recently, however, it has been decreed that computer files should have the Type code for their “significant aspect”; in other words, what type of information the content of the resource is. Therefore, if the CD-ROM (or other electronic resource) consists of maps, code it as a map; if it consists of music, code it as a score or sound recording. Type m should be used only for certain types of content:

software

numberic data

computer multimedia

online systems or services (e.g., OCLC)

CD-ROMs consisting of other types of content should be given the appropriate other Type code. The best thing for you to do at this point is to simply circle the Type on the printout and let a cataloger check it.

Location is usually “md” but we MAY get CD-ROMs for other locations: Reference (ref), Physics (phys), Fine Arts (fal), LRC (lrc), Chemistry (chem).

007 Should be present (it is not uncommon for this to have been left out, however. In that case, we should put it in)

Mat Catg: c (computer files)

Spec Mat: o (optical disk)

Undefine: blank

Color: c (color), a (one color), u (unknown)

Dimens: g (4 3/4 in.)

*Note: the above 4 fields (5 counting the “undefined” one) are the ones required for computer files. The following fields (Sound, ImageBit, File Fmt, QA Targt, Ant/Srce, Lvl Comp, and Rfmt Qual) are optional and are usually blank or have just a “-“ entered in them.

008 The only unusual subfield here is FileType (File in OCLC and in Bib Formats), which is used to specify the type of computer file it is. Usually we have those coded d (document; that is, text that can be searched and manipulated by the computer), but other options, such as a (numberic data), b (programs/software), c (pictorial/graphic data), e (bibliographic citations), g (games), h (sound), i (interactive multimedia, including audio and video stuff), m (combination of any of the above), u (unknown), etc.

You’ll notice that these codes aren’t necessarily easy to understand and apply. Generally, we go with whatever code was in the record to begin with, especially since we’re not actually mounting these on our machines and exploring the database–we have to trust what someone else decided to put in the record.

Variable Fields

Remember that information can come from anywhere so be suspicious if you see brackets in any fields, including 245. CD-ROMs do sometimes have personal or corporate authors (100/110), but sometimes they are like videos and have 245 main entries (and no clear “author”).

245 Title

The only distinctive thing here is |h[electronic resource] for the GMD. The other thing is that computer files require a note (500) stating the source of the title. This is discussed in more detail below.

246 Varying Forms of Titles

Be on the lookout for variant titles on different parts of the container, the disc label, accompanying leaflets, etc. Usually the form will be something like:

246 1 |iTitle on container:|aBlah blah blah blah

250 Edition or Version

This may be like a normal edition statement (“2nd ed.”) OR it may be couched in computer-ese: Version 2.1, Level 3.4, 3rd update, etc. If you took this information from a source other than the source of the title proper (e.g., if the title proper came from the disk surface but the “edition statement” came from the packaging), include a note to that effect.

250 Version 4.0

256 Computer File Characteristics

This field describes the type of file, when it’s possible for us to determine this information. AACR2r lists only three general designations: computer data, computer program(s), and computer data and program(s). Other standards (ISBD(ER); complete list is in Nancy Olson’s Cataloging Internet Resources) suggest more specific designations, such as computer census data, computer journals, computer map data, computer game, computer word processor program, etc. You should check for this field; if it doesn’t exist in the record, write “256" on the printout for Jason (and feel free to suggest a designation, if you like!); if the 256 is there, glance at it to check for typos and to see if it describes the content of the disc in a reasonable fashion. Jason will double-check if necessary.

A 256 field may also include the number of files or records in the computer file, though this is optional and rather rarely seen in the discs we receive. Check AACR2r and Bib Formats for formatting this information if necessary.

260 Publication, Distribution, Etc.

As with kits, this is pretty normal and can come from anywhere–but watch for varying dates on disc surface and container.

300 Physical Description

Practice for this area has changed even over the brief time we’ve been cataloging computer files. Current practice is to call a CD-ROM a “computer optical disc.” Formerly they were known as “computer laser optical discs,” and sometimes “disc” has been spelled “disk.” Change these to the correct current term if you see them. After naming the disc correctly (and listing the number of them), add other physical details such as sound (sd.) and color (col.). (These should also be present in the appropriate fixed fields if they appear in 300). Here we are going by what’s in the record but sometimes you can tell just by the description of the content of the CD-ROM on the package that it does have sound and color, even without loading and viewing it.

Then list the dimensions, which are always 4 3/4 in. for CD-ROMs.

Then accompanying material, if present (a user’s guide or booklet is not uncommon). Thus:

300 1 computer optical disc :|bsd., col. ;|c4 3/4 in.

300 3 computer optical discs ;|c4 3/4 in. +|e1 user’s guide.

5xx Notes

A few notes are unique to computer files.

538 System requirements

This is our old friend the “VHS” note from video records, but in a highly elaborated form. System requirements are usually printed on the container or accompanying leaflet (if we don’t have any packaging with the disc, we will have to trust what’s in the record). This note explains the hardware/software requirements for using the disc. Read through the note and make sure it’s accurate. Sometimes there will be two separate notes for PC and Mac requirements. Each 538 should begin with the phrase “System requirements:” but there are no subfields.

500 Source of title

This is required in CD-ROM records (though sometimes it has been left out). Just make up a brief phrase explaining where the title in 245 came from. For example:

500 Title from title screen.

500 Title from disc label.

It’s also possible to have a special 500 for “file characteristics,” but this is something you won’t see too often. Check AACR2 Chapter 9 for more details (9.7B8 for this particular note).

Item Record

Go through the usual item record creation/editing steps.

Itype = 23 (optical discs) or 53 (multimedia discs/DVD-ROM)

Location = possibilities include: mdcom (Media) refod (Reference Desk) chemd (Chemistry Library) falod (Fine Arts Library) physd (Physics Library)

Barcoding/labeling procedures vary from one branch to another. There are separate procedures for these things. Route as appropriate.

kmk10/13/00;rev4/30/01; ccm rev. 3/12/2015

the library catalog: CD-ROMs to branch libraries (Physics, Chemistry, Fine Arts)

In the interim (from Aug. 24, 2000 until final recommendations from the Supplemental Materials Committee) when a compact disc is designated to go to a branch library such as Physics, Chemistry, or Fine Arts, please use these instructions. Discs for LRC will have their own instructions. These instructions cover compact disc item type, location and status. An accompanying guide will be given a separate item record.

CD: Location: physd (PHYSICS-CDROM) chemd (CHEM-CDROM) falod (FAL MULTIMEDIA)

Status: - (AVAILABLE) Itype: 23 (Optical disks)

Guide: Location: physd (PHYSICS-CDROM) chemd (CHEM-CDROM) falod (FAL MULTIMEDIA)

Status: - (AVAILABLE) Itype: 0 (Monograph)

Vol: guide (Adds “guide” to call number)

Barcodes and labels may be attached to the guides as you would any other book. You should send the barcodes and labels for the actual compact discs unattached to the appropriate branch to be attached as they see fit. CDs should be put into a separate jewel box if they don’t already have one. Other packaging (e.g., a box that the entire CD/guide set came in) should be sent with the items to the branch to do with as they see fit.

kmk 8/24/2000

the library catalog: CD to Reference collection (temporary instructions)

In the interim (from now Aug. 1, 2000 until final recommendations from the Supplemental Materials Committee) when a compact disc is designated to go to the Reference collection, please use these instructions. This will be the best approach initially to save time. If someone discovers that another approach should be taken we will correct it at that time. These instructions are for compact disc item type, location and status. Accompanying guide will be given a separate item record.

CD: Location: refod (REF-CDROM)

Status: o (NON-CIRC)

Itype: 23 (Optical disks)

Guide: Location: refod (REF-CDROM)

Status: o (NON-CIRC)

Itype: 0 (Monograph)

Vol: guide (Adds “guide” to call number)

Barcodes and labels may be attached to the guides as you would any other book. You should send the barcodes and labels for the actual compact discs unattached to the Reference department to be applied as they see fit. If you think the pieces need to be reviewed then seek the assistance of Beth Juhl.

msk 08/01/00

Playaway Copy Cataloging

I. Introduction

A Playaway is described as a “self-playing digital audio book” and is a device that contains a preloaded audio file in a proprietary format called ACELP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algebraic_Code_Excited_Linear_Prediction). The device requires one AAA battery and a set of earphones for playback and listening.

II. Chief Source of Information

Preferred chief source: playaway player and any label stuck on the player Information not available from the player itself may be taken from the following sources (in the order of preference):

Accompanying textual material Container (e.g., packaging)

Other sources

III. Editing the Record

A. Fixed Fields

* These are instructions for editing fixed fields in an the library catalog display. The OCLC display looks somewhat different with regard to fixed fields.

LANG: Should be the 3-letter code for the language of the main content of the item (usually “eng”). Should match the “Language” subfield of 008

LOCATION: “md” BIB LVL: “m” for monograph

BCODE3: “x”

SKIP: the library catalog fills it in automatically.

CAT DATE: Enter today‟s date

MAT TYPE: should be coded as either “i” for non-music sound recordings, or “j” for music sound recordings. If it is “j” give the item to the cataloger

COUNTRY: The place of publication. Should match the first place named at the beginning of 260 and the “Country” subfield of 008.

006 Fixed Field for Additional Material Characteristics

Sample 006 for playaway:

006 m####g###h########

006/00 (Type): m for computer file

006/05 (Audn): g for general interest

006/09 (File) : h for sounds.

007 Fixed Fields for Further Physical Description

You will need to “expand” this field to be able to see it in the library catalog (in OCLC it looks different). In full-screen edit, position the cursor at the 007 and hit Ctrl + R. The same command will un-expand the field when you are done with it. For Playaway devices, add two 007 fields to describe the physical characteristics of the material as both a sound recording and an electronic resource. Sample 007 for electronic resource aspects:

007 c z n z a | | | | | | | |

007/00 (OCLC $a): c (electronic resource) for category of material

007/01 (OCLC $b): z (other) for specific material designation

007/03 (OCLC $d): n (not applicable) for color

007/04 (OCLC $e): z (other) for dimensions

007/05 (OCLC $f): a (sound on medium)

Sample 007 for sound recording aspects: 007 s z z u n z n n n z n z u

007/00 (OCLC $a): s (sound recording) for category of material

007/01 (OCLC $b): z (other) for specific material designation

007/03 (OCLC $d): z (other) for speed

007/04 (OCLC $e): u (unknown) for configuration of playback channels

007/05 (OCLC $f): n (not applicable) for groove width/pitch 007/06 (OCLC $g): z (other) for dimensions

007/07 (OCLC $h): n (not applicable) for tape width

007/08 (OCLC $i): n (not applicable) for tape configuration

007/09 (OCLC $j): n (not applicable) for kind of disc/cylinder/tape

007/10 (OCLC $k): z (other) for kind of material

007/11 (OCLC $l): n (not applicable) for kind of cutting

007/12 (OCLC $m): e (digital recording) for special playback characteristics

007/13 (OCLC $n): u (unknown) for capture/storage techniques

008 Further Fixed Fields

You will also need to “expand” this field in order to see it in the library catalog.

008 does not appear in OCLC; the information is held in the fixed fields that appear at the top of an OCLC record display instead. Check the fixed fields of the OCLC record; make sure they match the following codes for nonmusic sound recording:

Type = i

Comp = “nn”

FMus = n

Form = s

LTxt (Literary Text for Sound Recordings)

Value “blank” is only used for musical recordings.

Select from the following: a Autobiography b Biography c Conference proceedings d Drama e Essays f Fiction. Novels, short stories, etc. g Reporting h History. May include historical dramas, historical poetry, etc. i Instruction. (How to...) j Language instruction k Comedy l Lectures, speeches m Memoirs o Folktales p Poetry r Rehearsals s Sounds. Nonmusical utterances and vocalizations that may or may not convey meaning; for example, sound effects, natural sounds and bird calls. t Interviews z Other Check the date fields depending on whether the Playaway is the first release of the sound recording or whether there were prior releases.

Example 1: Playaway recording released in 2007, no prior releases of the sound recording 008/06 (DtSt) = s (single date) 008/07-14 (Dates) = 2007,####

Example 2: Playaway recording released in 2007, originally released on cassettes in 2000 and on compact discs in 2005. 008/06 (DtSt) = r (reprint/reissue date and original date) 008/07-14 (Dates) = 2007,2000 *See also information in 260 Publication/Distribution regarding dates in the 260 field.

B. Variable Fields

020 ISBN

Indicators are blank. Check if the number is correct. 028 Publisher’s number 1 st indicator: 0 (“issue number”) 2 nd indicator: 0 (“No note, no added entry”) Example:

028 00 3312|bPlayaway Digital Audio

The publisher‟s number should be entered as exactly as it appears on the piece (including spaces and hyphens). The publisher‟s name should match |b of the 260.

041 Language

1st indicator: 0=item includes no translation; 1=item is a translation 2 nd indicator: blank

Most playaways will be just English, and will get no 041 but should have “eng” in the two language fixed fields. If spoken/sung text on the playaway includes another language, a 041 field is needed. In this case, the main language of the item does not go in |a. There is NO |a; use |d (language of sung or spoken text) as the first subfield. Accompanying textual material‟s language goes in |g. Translations also get |h to indicate the original language.

049 Local Holdings

Indicators are blank This field will already say “AFUA” as the general designation for our library. You will need to change this to the specific code “AFUH” for the media location.

050/090 Library of Congress Call Number

090 Indicators are blank. If there is no call number, ask cataloger to assign a call number. If there is a call number: Check the library catalog to make sure the Cutter will allow it to file in correct alphabetical order. Cutter number comes from the main entry (either 100/110, or 245). Use the (latest) date in the 260 for date.

1xx Author (personal or corporate) / Uniform Title Main Entry

Unlike videos, a 1xx field is quite likely to appear in playaways. The author of the playaway content is considered the author of the playaway. Remember 1xx should be checked for the authority record in the library catalog. If not found, check in OCLC, and export the authority record to the library catalog. If not found in OCLC neither, give to the cataloger to create new authority records. Also make sure what‟s in 1xx should match the authority record. There are 2 types of 1xx you are likely to see: 100 and 110.

100 Main Entry–Personal Name

1st indicator: usually 1 (for surnames coming first) but 0 if the person has only first names (like “Madonna”) 2nd indicator: blank The author should also be listed in 245|c. If there are multiple authors listed, only the first goes in 100, the others go into separate 700 fields.

110 Main Entry–Corporate Name

1st indicator: 1 (jurisdiction name first) or 2 (name in direct order) 2nd indicator blank.

245 Title & Statement of Responsibility

1 st indicator: 1 if there is a 1xx main entry; 0 if not 2 nd indicator: number of characters to skip when indexing. “The”=4; “A”=2; “An”=3, etc. Punctuation is as follows:

Title proper|h[general material designation] / |cstatement of responsibility.

Note: The general material designation for playaways is |h [electronic resource] Example:

245 04 The Walden |h [electronic resource] / |c Henry David Thoreau.

246 Varying Form of Title

This is used when there is something “funny” about the title: a number or symbol that could be spelled out (&, Æ, etc.); a slightly different form of the title appearing on the container, a portion of the complete title proper may be a more natural title search, etc. Indicators vary. The 246 has the same capitalization rules as 245, but don‟t include |h[GMD]. Also omit initial articles (the, an, etc.), but do use the |b if you are using a subtitle. There is no statement of responsibility in a 246. Some common examples:

a. Spelling out numbers, symbols, abbreviations. Indicators are “3#”

245 00 101 dalmatians|h[electronic resource]....

246 3# One hundred and one dalmatians

or 245 00 Guys & dolls|h[electronic resource] /|ca story by Damon Runyon ....

246 3# Guys and dolls

b. Title varies in different physical places. Indicators are “1#”.

A |i message explaining where the title appears should be the first part of 246. This message will usually be “Title on container:” or “Title on accompanying leaflet:”. This initial |i is then followed by the |a that has the actual title in it.

245 00 1978 presidential debates

246 1# |iTitle on accompanying booklet:|aPresidential debates of 1978

*note that there is no space before the colon in |i here

c. Portion of title from 245. Occasionally, the subtitle of a work may seem a more natural search to people than the first part of the title proper in the 245. Indicators are “30".

245 00 History of the world|h[electronic resource] :|bcenturies of something

246 30 Centuries of something

d. Parallel title. Contained in |b in the 245, a parallel title in another language may get its own 246. Indicators are “31"

245 04 Das Boot|h[electronic resource] =|bThe boat ...

246 31 Boat (*notice that the initial article of the parallel title “The” has been omitted in the 246)

250 Edition

Transcribe an edition statement if one appears in the chief source or in information provided by the publisher. Example:

250 ## Unabridged.

260 Publication / Distribution

Transcribe the place of publication and/or distribution, and the name(s) of the publisher and/or distributor from the chief source of information or from prescribed sources of information. Include the name(s) of the entities responsible for issuing the recording on the Playaway device (usually, Playaway Digital Audio as the “label name”, and/or Findaway World LLC as the manufacturer/distributor). The date(s) entered in the 260 field should always include the publication/distribution date for the sound recording that is held on the Playaway device. As Playaways were first commercially available in the second half of 2005, the publication/distribution date entered in the catalog record for the Playaway (i.e., Date1 in the fixed field and the first date listed in the 260 .c) may NOT be dated earlier than 2005. As is the practice for other sound recordings, if the recording has been previously released, such as in a different format, the original publication/distribution date of the sound recording should be noted in the 008 fixed field (Date2) and in a 500 general note. The dates of the print publication may be ignored. Refer to AACR2 1.4F2 and 6.4F2 for further details. Example 1:

Title with copyright date, inferred to be the release date of the Playaway

The title “Peter Pan” has on the container: p2002 by Sound Room Publishers for the original recording, and c2007 by Findaway World LLC for the Playaway.

In this case for which the Playaway indicates a previous release of the content in another recording medium (e.g., CD, cassette, etc.), the 008/06 (DtSt) should be coded “r” (reprint/reissue date and original date) with Date 1 as the “release” date of the Playaway, and Date 2 as the date of the original release in the previous medium. Since the "p‟ date on the item represents the original recording, the copyright date given for the Playaway can be inferred to be the release date of the Playaway recording, and therefore bracketed and entered in field 260 .c, as well as Date1 of the 008 fixed field.

008/06 (DtSt) = r (reprint/reissue date and original date)

008/07-14 (Dates) = 2007,2002

260 ## [Solon, Ohio] : |b Findaway World LLC, |c [2007], p2002.

500 ## Previously released by Sound Room Publishers, p2002.

Example 2: Title distributed by Recorded Books with previous release date

008/06 (DtSt) = r (reprint/reissue date and original date)

008/07-14 (Dates) = 2006,2005

260 ## [Solon, Ohio] : |b Findaway World, LLC ; |a Prince Frederick, MD : |b [exclusively distributed by] Recorded books, LLC, |c [2006], p2005.

500 ## Previously released by Tantor Media, Inc., p2005.

Example 3: Playaway recording released in 2007, no prior releases of the sound recording

008/06 (DtSt) = s (single date)

008/07-14 (Dates) = 2007,#### 260 ## [Solon, Ohio] : |b Playaway Digital Audio : |b [manufactured and distributed by] Findaway World LLC, |c [2007].

Example 4: Playaway recording with copyright date of 2007, originally released by HarperAudio on cassettes in 2000 and on compact discs in 2005, but no „p‟ dates on materials.

008/06 (DtSt) = r (reprint/reissue date and original date)

008/07-14 (Dates) = 2007,2000 260 ## [Solon, Ohio] : |b Playaway Digital Audio : |b [manufactured and distributed by] Findaway World LLC, |c [2007].

500 ## Previously released by HarperAudio on cassettes in 2000 and on compact discs in 2005.

300 Physical Description

Always include a 300 field for Playaway devices. Use “sound media player” for the specific material designation (SMD), enter the type of recording as “digital,” and the dimensions of the Playaway device in inches. Playaway devices are usually packaged with and require a set of earphones and one AAA battery for playback. These items should be mentioned in a note, and NOT included in the 300 |e as “accompanying materials.” Examples:

300 ## 1 sound media player (21 hr., 30 mins.) : .b digital ; .c 3 3/8 x 2 1/8 in.

500 ## One set of earphones and one AAA battery required for playback. Subfield (|e) is used for “accompanying material,” which may include booklets, leaflets, manuals, textbooks, etc. It can be listed instead in a 500 field (see 5xx Notes-Section D-Accompanying Material Note). For example:

300 ## 1 sound media player (3 hr.) : |b digital ; |c 3 3/8 x 2 1/8 in. +|e1 book (30 p. : col. ill., 28cm.)

4xx Series

See Series Authority Procedures for Copy Cataloging

5xx Notes

Include appropriate notes in prescribed order as specified in AACR2 Chapters 6 and 9. The following list provides common notes for Playaways. 546 Language If necessary. Also check 041 and fixed fields.

511 Cast/Participant/Performer

Statement of Responsibility [Required, if applicable] 1st indicator: 1 if the note is a list of cast members playing parts. 0 if it isn‟t (it might instead be a narrator or presenter) 2nd indicator: blank.

Lists important actors, performers, readers, interviewees, hosts, etc. List information regarding individuals on the sound recording or involved in the technical aspects of its production, just as for other sound recordings. For Playaways, this often consists of the name of the narrator entered in a participant/performer note. For example:

511 0# Read by Robert Sean Leonard.

500 Source of Title Proper [Required]

For Playaways, the title proper is generally taken from the packaging, the container, or accompanying textual materials. Example:

500 ## Title from Playaway label.

500 Edition and History [Optional]

If it is noted on the packaging or is readily ascertained that the audio recording has been previously released, enter this information in a general 500 note. Example:

500 ## Previously released by HarperAudio on cassettes in 2000 and on CDs in 2005.

500 Accompanying Material [Mandatory if applicable]

Include a general note regarding the requirement of earphones and battery. Example:

500 ## One set of earphones and one AAA battery required for playback. Enter information for accompany materials that are not listed in 300|e. For example:

500 ## Teacher‟s manual (20 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.) inserted in container.

500 General Quoted note [Optional]

When a statement appears on the packaging describing the device, enter it in a 500 quoted note. Examples:

500 ## “Issued on Playaway, a dedicated audio media player”--Container.

500 ## “Playaway, the first pre-loaded digital audio book”--Container.

If a statement does not explicitly appear on the packaging or item, such a statement describing the characteristics of a Playaway may be entered in the record as a general unquoted note.

520 Summary

Check for misspellings if there is a 520; if none, give to the cataloger to write one.

505 Contents

1st indicator: 0=full contents; 1=incomplete contents (if rest of item is missing); 2=partial contents 2nd indicator: usually blank If the playaway is a reading of a single book, don‟t bother to list chapter contents, but separate stories or poems should be listed in 505.

6xx Subject Headings

Check if subject headings are appropriate to content Change “655 #0 Audiobooks” to “650 #0 Audiobooks” Add “650 #0 Audiobooks” if missing

7xx. Added Entries

If the playaway is a reading of a book, there should be already a 100 for the book‟s author and don‟t need an additional 700. We do need 700s for actors/readers/performers/whatever they are called, unless there is a ridiculously large number of them (in this case, ask the cataloger) 700/710 should be made for the narrator(s) noted in the 511 field. If desired, 710s should be made for the publishers of the original recordings, the Playaway publishers, and the distributors of the Playaway device (Playaway Digital Audio and Findaway World LLC). Examples:

700 1# Leonard, Robert Sean, |d 1969-

710 2# Random House AudioBooks (Firm)

710 2# Playaway Digital Audio.

710 2# Findaway World LLC.

Note: 7xx should be checked for the authority record in the library catalog. If not found, check in OCLC, and export the authority record to the library catalog. If not found in OCLC neither, give to the cataloger to create new authority records. Also make sure what‟s in 7xx should match the authority record.

8xx. Series Added Entries

There is no initial article for the field, and the second indicator should be “0”

945 Initials

Item Records and Physical Processing: Use Playaway template to attach an item. See “Processing Audio Books” for physical processing details.

Statistics (on the Non-Books Statistics Sheet)

Count 1 title/piece completed as Playaways (itype 70) under row OCLC and Column MD

EXD/DEK 100215

Loading ...
University of Arkansas Libraries
365 N. McIlroy Ave.
Fayetteville, AR 72701-4002
  • Phone: 479-575-4104
  • Toll-free: 866-818-8115
  • Fax: 479-575-6656