RefWorks

This guide will present RefWorks to help with managing your sources as you research.

Type in your References

Even if you cannot import citations into your RefWorks account automatically, you can enter footnotes, endnotes, or citations from print references one at a time. To do so:

  1. Open your RefWorks account and select References > Add New Reference (click on button and blank form will
    appear).
  2. Look at the citation you wish to input and determine the author, title, date, and other fields.

    This example is a citation of a journal article:
    Kilinc, M., and J. Beringer. 2007. The spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strikes and their relationship with
    vegetation type, elevation, and fire sears in the northern territory. Journal of Climate 20, (7) (APR 1): 1161-1173.


    Manually add references



  3. You can change the citation format in the "View Fields Used By" so that only the fields used in that format will be provided first. Additional fields can still be found by clicking the Additional Fields link below.

  4. It is important that you determine the correct Ref Type (reference type) so that the information is properly stored in RefWorks.  Some common Ref Types are:

    • Abstract
    • Artwork
    • Bills/Resolutions
    • Book,edited
    • Book,section
    • Book,whole
    • Case/Court Decision
    • Computer Programs
    • Conference Proceedings
    • Dissertation,thesis
    • Generic
    • Grant
    • Hearing
    • Journal
    • Journal, Electronic
    • Laws/Statutes
    • Magazine Article
    • Map
    • Monograph
    • Motion Picture
    • Music Score
    • Newspaper Article
    • Online Discussion Forum/Blogs
    • Patent
    • Personal Communication
    • Report
    • Sound Recording
    • Unpublished Material
    • Video/DVD
    • Web Page


    5. When you have entered the citation information, click Save. 

Not for the Faint of Heart: Tagging References in Documents

Feeling daring?  You can mark up or tag elements in a word-processed bibliography so that the references can be imported into RefWorks. 

To import references that have been formatted as a bibliography within a word processing document, the references must
be manually tagged.

  1. Open a Word file and paste in the reference citations. Break each citation into data parts or fields as below, and remove the punctuation between each part.  Example:

    Journal Article
    Kilinc, M
    Beringer, J
    The spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strikes and their relationship with vegetation type, elevation, and fire sears in the Northern Territory
    JOURNAL OF CLIMATE
    20
    7
    1161
    1173
    April
    2007
    English
    Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
    FLASH CHARACTERISTICS
    CLOUD
    SEASON
    THUNDERSTORMS
    In this paper the authors explore the spatial and temporal patterns of lightning strikes in northern Australia for the first time. In particular, the possible relationships between lightning strikes and elevation, vegetation type, and fire scars (burned areas) are examined. Lightning data provided by the Bureau of Meteorology were analyzed for a 6-yr period (1998-2003) over the northern, southern, and coastal regions of the Northern Territory (NT) through the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to determine the spatial and temporal characteristics of lightning strikes. It was determined that the highest densities of lightning strikes occurred during the monsoon transitional period (dry to wet) and during the active monsoon periods, when atmospheric moisture is highest. For the period of this study. lightning was far more prevalent over the northern region (1.21 strikes per km(2) yr(-1)) than over the southern (0.58 strikes per km(2) y(-1)) and coastal regions (0.71 strikes per km(2) yr(-1)). Differences in vegetation cover were suggested to influence the lightning distribution over the northern region of the NT, but no relationship was found in the southern region. Lightning strikes in the southern region showed a positive relationship with elevations above 800 m, but no relationship was found in the northern region, which could be due to the low-lying topography of the area. A comparison of lightning densities between burned and unburned areas showed high variabilitv however, the authors suggest that, under ideal atmospheric conditions, large-scale fire scars (> 500 m) could produce lightning strikes triggered by either enhanced free convection or mesoscale circulations.
    Monash Univ, Sch Geog & Environm Sci, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia
    musa.kilinc@arts.monash.edu.au

  2. Add the tags corresponding to each data part. The first line of each citation must be the reference type (RT) tag.
    Tags used by RefWorks include:



    RT=Reference Type
    A1=Primary Authors
    A2=Secondary Authors
    A3=Tertiary Authors
    A4=Quaternary Authors
    A5=Quinary Authors
    A6=Website Editors
    AB=Abstract
    AD=Author Address
    AN=Accession Number
    AV=Availability
    CL=Classification
    CN=Call Number
    CR=Cited References
    DB=Database
    DO=Document Object Index
    DS=Data Source
    ED=Edition
    FD=Publication Data, Free Form
    ID=Reference Identifier
    IP=Identifying Phrase
    IS=Issue JF=Periodical Full
    JO=Periodical Abbrev
    K1=Keyword
    LA=Language
    LK=Links
    LL=Sponsoring Library Loc
    NO=Notes
    OP=Other Pages
    OT=Original Foreign Title
    PB=Publisher
    PP=Place of Publication
    RD=Retrieved Date
    SF=Subfile/Database
    SL=Sponsoring Library
    SN=ISSN/ISBN
    SP=Start Page
    ST=Shortened Title
    T1=Primary Title
    T2=Secondary Title
    T3=Tertiary Title
    U1=User 1
    U2=User 2
    U3=User 3
    U4=User 4
    U5=User 5
    VO=Volume
    WP=Date/Elec. Publication
    WT=Website Title
    WV=Website Version
    YR=Publication Year


    Example:

    RT Journal Article
    A1 Kilinc, M
    A1 Beringer, J
    TI The spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strikes and their relationship with vegetation type, elevation, and fire sears in the Northern Territory
    JO JOURNAL OF CLIMATE
    VO 20
    IS 7
    SP1161
    OP 1173
    FD April
    TR 2007
    LA English
    K1 Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
    K1 FLASH CHARACTERISTICS
    K1 CLOUD
    K1 SEASON
    K1 THUNDERSTORMS
    AB In this paper the authors explore the spatial and temporal patterns of lightning strikes in northern Australia for the first time. In particular, the possible relationships between lightning strikes and elevation, vegetation type, and fire scars (burned areas) are examined. Lightning data provided by the Bureau of Meteorology were analyzed for a 6-yr period (1998-2003) over the northern, southern, and coastal regions of the Northern Territory (NT) through the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to determine the spatial and temporal characteristics of lightning strikes. It was determined that the highest densities of lightning strikes occurred during the monsoon transitional period (dry to wet) and during the active monsoon periods, when atmospheric moisture is highest. For the period of this study. lightning was far more prevalent over the northern region (1.21 strikes per km(2) yr(-1)) than over the southern (0.58 strikes per km(2) y(-1)) and coastal regions (0.71 strikes per km(2) yr(-1)). Differences in vegetation cover were suggested to influence the lightning distribution over the northern region of the NT, but no relationship was found in the southern region. Lightning strikes in the southern region showed a positive relationship with elevations above 800 m, but no relationship was found in the northern region, which could be due to the low-lying topography of the area. A comparison of lightning densities between burned and unburned areas showed high variabilitv however, the authors suggest that, under ideal atmospheric conditions, large-scale fire scars (> 500 m) could produce lightning strikes triggered by either enhanced free convection or mesoscale circulations.
    AD Monash Univ, Sch Geog & Environm Sci, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia; musa.kilinc@arts.monash.edu.au

  3. Once the tags are set, save this as a Plain Text file. (*.txt).
  4. Open your RefWorks account and select References then Import.
  5. Select RefWorks Tagged Format as the filter and choose the text file that has been saved.
  6. Click the Import button.
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